Aids; a brief

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Save A Kid in Africa Today (SAKAT) saves and improves children's lives around the world. We work to ensure children have healthcare, food and shelter, as well as learning and child protection services when children need it most. We are committed to helping all children achieve their full potential by ensuring they grow up healthy, receive a good education, and stay safe.Securing children's rights is the foundation of our work. Millions of children around the world are denied their rights, simply because of who they are or where they are from. We know that to ensure every child has the chance for a future their rights must be upheld.Through our programming, emergency responses and advocacy, we put the most vulnerable children first, tackling the barriers to survival, learning and protection.

In Defence of Foreign Aid

Make Africa Better.
Make Africa Better.

In Defence of Foreign Aid

Foreign aid to African rights groups is not a bad thing. Human rights are universal, and all people, regardless of their citizenship, are connected to, and responsible for, each other.

As American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” Extending financial aid to human rights advocates is beneficial to all, regardless of the money’s geographic source.

The inter-relatedness of all peoples is clear in my home region of West Africa, where political conflicts in Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Niger and Togo are adversely affecting both these countries and their neighbours. Even populations not directly implicated in the instability must pay to defend their borders, care for refugees, and overcome economic disruptions.

Helping local rights workers in these conflicted countries thus benefits Western Africa as a whole, as well as the taxpayers worldwide who fund the related peacekeeping and development work of the African Union and United Nations.

All is not well in the world of international aid to domestic human rights, however. The global financial crisis has hit donor countries hard, and many are reviewing their overseas commitments. The United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), for example, says it is shifting its focus to economic development and reducing its financial support for conventional human rights issues. The Australian government’s Human Rights Grants Scheme, which has helped many local rights groups’ initiatives in Africa and elsewhere, recently announced it will suspend funding activities for 2013-2014.

International donors are increasingly interested in finding local solutions to local problems. African Development Bank President Donald Kaberuka, for example, suggests that the African private sector must start funding local NGOs. Many private companies already support corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities, enabling them to contribute  tax-deductible funds to a variety of social causes.

These CSR funds can be problematic, however. Whenever NGOs collaborate with the private sector, they tend to become implementers of the company’s CSR agenda, rather than autonomous grant recipients. A study by the U.K.-based International Training and Research Centre demonstrates that relations between NGOs and CSR programs are often challenging, and that more often than not, the parties do not agree on shared goals. Not surprising, of course, as their purposes and interests often differ quite radically. Aligning the interests of African NGOs and private companies is thus crucial, but hard to do.

Critics of foreign aid say it undermines local NGOs’ autonomy and introduces the profit motive into a hitherto value-based activity. There is no guarantee, however, that contributions from African sources will not have the same, or even worse, effects. African donors, after all, are just as likely as their international counterparts to be driven by political considerations or ideological fads, and African money can just as easily subvert the voluntarism of domestic rights workers. Problems of this sort don’t magically disappear when donors are based in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America, rather than in Australia, Canada, Europe or the U.S.

Still, there is no doubt that African rights groups, like any civil society organization, should depend on a broad mix of resources. They should pursue foreign aid as well as local financial support, conduct income-generating business activities, raise membership fees, and benefit from bequests and legacies by African supporters. The more broadly based its funding, the more likely any NGO is to retain its autonomy.

How NGOs can raise Funds in a Strategic Manner

Photo credit: alamy
Photo credit: alamy

How NGOs can raise Funds in a Strategic Manner

How NGOs can raise Funds in a Strategic Manner


NGOs often get lost when they have to start planning to raise funds for their projects and programs. As soon as one project ends, they quickly need to look around for more funding to sustain their work. But funding may not be immediately available for them to grab it.

In order to counter such a situation, it is important for NGOs to have a strategy. Fundraising strategy is always kept on the back burner by NGOs because they lack the skills to develop it.

Here, we are providing a simple and short guide to help you understand and develop a fundraising strategy and how you can raise funds in a strategic manner.


How NGOs can identify different types of resources for raising support


In a fundraising strategy, the first and foremost activity to be carried out is identifying what kinds of resources are available or that can be mobilized for the organization. Identifying these resources can be easy but you can miss out many important sources of support if you do not brainstorm this activity with your team.

Once you have assembled your team and informed them about the need to raise funds, they can be some good ideas coming in from your staff as well. You can start listing them down under proper headings like below:

Once you have identified different types of resources that can be tapped for your organization, you can start giving priority (or stars) for each of them. Giving priority to each of them helps save time. For example, you may have to spend more time in tapping funding from potential donors and less time on seeking individual donations. You can discuss within your team on prioritizing this as you know the best about your situation. You may find that there is a possibility of getting international volunteers easily than writing and submitting proposals. In this case, you can spend more time on searching for these volunteers.

Besides prioritizing these sources of support, you can also assign responsibilities for yourself and your staff. For example, you as the head of the organization can write effective proposals so you can assign yourself for tapping the ‘Potential Donor Agencies’ support area. Your staff may be good at field work; then they can be involved in going around your city to collect individual donations or any type of in-kind support.



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